Physics for Surgeons - Part 4: Energy Devices in Surgery

  • Darakhshan Qaiser Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
  • Piyush Ranjan Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
  • Kamal Kataria Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
  • Anita Dhar Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
  • Anurag Srivastava Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

Abstract

Modern surgery has advanced astoundingly in the last century owing to the advent of number of energy devices in the operation room. Surgeon in the past were only using electric current –monopolar diathermy to burn and couterize the tissue, the present day surgeons are equiped with a number of more advanced energy devices e.g. LASER, ultrasonic vibrating shears, radiofrequency, shockwaves, argon beam coagulator and advanced bipolar electric energy with hybrid systems and light energy of different wavelengths. In the present paper, we have explained the physical principles involved in the commonly used energy devices in the operation theatre.

Keywords: Energy Devices, Laser, Electrical Devices, Ultrasonic, Light

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Author Biographies

Darakhshan Qaiser, Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

Post Doctoral Fellow

Piyush Ranjan, Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

Associate Professor

Kamal Kataria, Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

Assistant Professor

Anita Dhar, Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

Professor

Anurag Srivastava, Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

Professor

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Published
2020-04-13
How to Cite
[1]
D. Qaiser, P. Ranjan, K. Kataria, A. Dhar, and A. Srivastava, “Physics for Surgeons - Part 4: Energy Devices in Surgery”, Int. Ann. Sci., vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 122-131, Apr. 2020.
Section
Review Article