Comparison of Fructose and Glycerol as Plasticizers in Cassava Bioplastic Production

  • Stephen Mukuze School of Science and Technology, Department of Biological Sciences and Agriculture, University of Eastern Africa Baraton, Kenya
  • Hillary Magut School of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics, Chemistry, and Physics. University of Eastern Africa Baraton, Kenya
  • Frankson Lovemore Mkandawire School of Science and Technology, Department of Biological Sciences and Agriculture, University of Eastern Africa Baraton, Kenya

Abstract

This research paper is an investigation into the effects of fructose and glycerol as plasticizers in cassava bioplastic production. The experiments were carried out at the University of Eastern Africa, Baraton Department of Chemistry. The objectives of the research were to produce cassava-based bioplastics in the University of Eastern Africa, Baraton Chemistry Department Laboratory, to investigate the use of fructose and glycerol as plasticizers in the production of the cassava-based bioplastics and to conduct physical and chemical quality tests on the bioplastics to determine which plasticizer is best for industrial use. A Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) was used in the experiments. The parameters measured were film thickness, density, moisture content, solubility in water, water absorption, swelling index, and biodegradability test. Overall, fructose as a plasticizer is recommended over glycerol and over fructose and glycerol.

Keywords: Plasticizer, Glycerol, Fructose, Cassava, Bioplastic, Biopolymer

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Published
2019-07-08
How to Cite
[1]
S. Mukuze, H. Magut, and F. Mkandawire, “Comparison of Fructose and Glycerol as Plasticizers in Cassava Bioplastic Production”, Adv. J. Grad. Res., vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 41-52, Jul. 2019.
Section
Graduate Research Articles